Depositphotos. Reader's DigestIt can be exhausting – sifting through the Web, searching for something to both entertain and educate oneself. Well, we’ve decided to help and cherry picked for you a few examples of what in our view could make a great lunch time reading. Watch videos, look at pictures, read articles and let’s have something to talk about later!

Curious People

 

American photographer and writer out of Brooklyn Michael Webster in his photo essay the dual meaning of the phrase “Curious People.” One meaning is straight out of the dictionary. The other is a euphemism for “freaks.” Some curious people are curious about curious people. Others are curious people in and of themselves. When the curious meet the curious, when upstairs meets downstairs, when cool intellect meets raw emotion, the results are often very strange.

National Geographic Photographers Talking About Why They Take Pictures

 

It’s more a news, rather than reading material but this news is a major promise to anyone interested in all things photography related. So, here it goes: with this inspirational video featuring a diverse collection of National Geographic photographers talking about why they take pictures, the magazine has launched a new photography blog called “Proof.”

Behind Glass. Monkeys Black and White Photos

 

In her astonishing series “Behind Glass” Anne Berry refers both to the glass or boundaries of an enclosure and to the glass of the camera lens and various Primates in between. “…Often I find myself gazing into the eyes of a monkey, – remarks the artist, – his hand touching the glass wall that separates our worlds and I feel a responsibility to take part, to contribute…”

Flat 47

An awe inspiring, yet very simplistic documentary by London based photographer Owen Harvey. Since 2010 Owen has worked on a number of long term projects. Flat 47 has been in the making since he took to visiting and photographing friends and acquaintances spending time in Barry Whelan’s flat…

Kuwait Street Art. Darth Vader and Stormtroopers

 

Across the Middle East, Western culture is increasingly used to promote Arab ideologies to young generations, through hip-hop, comic books and Fulla dolls, as Natalie Naccache’s latest project presents